Mike McCahill Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Mike McCahill

Mike McCahill
Tomatometer-approved critic

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3/5 100% Shakuntala Devi (2020) What results is a biopic with genuine character.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jul 30, 2020
2/5 60% Dreambuilders (2020) If you just wanted to plonk everyone down in front of pretty shapes and colours for 80 minutes, then Dreambuilders will serve you on the same level as the loop-the-loops of last year's equally middling Wonder Park...‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jul 15, 2020
2/5 73% Gulabo Sitabo (2020) You watch puzzled as - like the ageing pile at the story's centre - the film flakes, moulders and crumbles before you.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
2/5 22% The Jesus Rolls (2020) Choppiness is the real issue. There are baffling shunts from town to country, while the middle stretch tosses up scenes with no real function or punchline.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2020
2/5 47% My Spy (2020) Bautista is amiable company, although he seems bemused at having to take dodgeballs to the face this early in his movie career, and perhaps by the mixed messaging.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Mar 12, 2020
2/5 No Score Yet The Rescue (2020) It's just you might reasonably want your films a little more stirring and challenging, and not quite so obviously rubber-stamped.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jan 23, 2020
C- 75% The Gentlemen (2020) "The Gentlemen" is the film Britain deserves as it staggers backwards into the New Year under the questionable influence of an unabashedly populist leader. America: save yourselves.‐ indieWire
Read More | Posted Dec 19, 2019
3/5 63% The Last Right (2019) Gently heartwarming, mildly amusing, only vaguely related to real life.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Dec 5, 2019
2/5 17% The Whistleblower (2019) The Whistleblower starts to feel needlessly woolly by the end, and British viewers may find one particular script quirk impassable.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Dec 5, 2019
4/5 No Score Yet The Amber Light (2019) Extremely good company, this is a film made for nippy late-November afternoons.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Nov 22, 2019
3/5 91% Blue Story (2020) An assured and capably performed morality play.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Nov 22, 2019
3/5 94% Klaus (2019) An old-school, PG-rated animation, encompassing some digital wizardry, but generally clinging to a nostalgic, hand-drawn look, with a late-blooming Christmas theme.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Nov 6, 2019
2/5 56% Saand Ki Aankh (2019) This feels like a waste of rich narrative possibilities, as mechanically feelgood as those two dozen Britflicks that have cast Dames Dench, Smith et al as old dears who shoot from the lip.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 24, 2019
4/5 No Score Yet Lost Lives (2019) Few films released in 2019 have seemed as timely or as urgent as Lost Lives.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 17, 2019
3/5 94% The Dead Center (2019) [An] effective low-key chiller...‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019
3/5 33% The Climbers (2019) Lee balances vertiginous, windswept set-pieces with satisfying character beats.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 4, 2019
2/5 76% Hotel Mumbai (2019) Art born of outrage has to be more rigorous - and we might also contemplate what merit there is in guaranteeing prospective terrorists a filmed account of their misdeeds.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Sep 27, 2019
3/5 No Score Yet To Tokyo (2018) Here's one of those rare lowish-budget, entirely off-radar British debuts that feels like a discovery.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2019
5/5 99% For Sama (2019) Profoundly moving and unignorable, whether as proof of Assad's barbarism, or the unfailing ability of this world - and its most engaged cinema - to break your heart and sear your soul.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2019
4/5 94% Inna De Yard: The Soul of Jamaica (2019) It's one of those docs that wins you over with its spirit: the collected histories reframe the music as one of resistance, resilience, survival, and the tried-and-tested beats pulsing through the cinema sound-system can't help but back them up.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Aug 30, 2019
2/5 65% Asterix: The Secret of the Magic Potion (Astérix - Le secret de la potion magique) (2018) The equivalent of the last comic on the shelf at the campsite supermarket: it may provide some distraction, but don't expect much.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Aug 29, 2019
2/5 39% Angel Has Fallen (2019) As with many of [Butler's] recent projects, it's been compiled with minimal quality control, insistently cancelling out its better ideas with turns for the derivative.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
3/5 84% Dora and the Lost City of Gold (2019) An appreciably peppy entertainment.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Aug 16, 2019
3/5 73% The Angry Birds Movie 2 (2019) Van Orman approaches this expanded universe with something of the visual ambition of Pixar's Brad Bird and a restless, playful spirit reminiscent of the Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs films.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Aug 2, 2019
3/5 100% The Edge (2019) Some intriguing turn in this narrative elevates the film a notch or two over standard sports-doc fodder.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2019
2/5 0% The Queen's Corgi (2019) Kesteloot and Stassen are too busy scrabbling for content - basically fine, largely indifferent, sometimes misjudged - to fill the gaps between the frenetic set pieces.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jul 5, 2019
2/5 No Score Yet Arifa (2019) Here's a homegrown debut that appears hellbent on snuffing out its own flickers of promise.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2019
3/5 60% HERO: Inspired by the Extraordinary Life & Times of Mr. Ulric Cross (2018) The film gets episodic late on, yet remains stimulating and provocative - filmed history that means to prompt debate, rather than light matinee snoozing.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jun 21, 2019
4/5 70% Mari (2018) An engrossing close study of a thirtysomething woman caught between two worlds, and two states of being.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jun 20, 2019
2/5 57% The Hummingbird Project (2019) It's the kind of verbose corporate parable David Mamet would sit down to write after a heavy night on the sauce.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
3/5 90% I Am Mother (2019) Think of it as a movie-length episode of The Twilight Zone or Black Mirror.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jun 6, 2019
3/5 60% Liam Gallagher: As It Was (2019) Gallagher remains a showman; what the directors reveal is the musician having to work doubly hard to win back those fans he mugged off a decade ago. Odds are this story has a third act.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jun 6, 2019
2/5 32% Bharat (2019) Bharat needs rewrites, or at least some kind of breath test.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jun 6, 2019
2/5 No Score Yet I Love My Mum (2019) The writing rarely rises above bizarro sketchiness, and if you think the deployment of mute migrants as a plot device is glib, wait until you see the punchline.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 31, 2019
4/5 90% John McEnroe: In the Realm of Perfection (L'empire de la perfection) (2018) McEnroe makes a fascinating focal point.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
2/5 62% Breakthrough (2019) Here is another illustration of how the faith-based drama has pushed into cinemas material indistinguishable from vast swathes of the afternoon TV schedule.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 17, 2019
3/5 98% Beats (2020) Compared with Mia Hansen-Løve's resonant French house drama Eden, or Michael Winterbottom's kaleidoscopic 24 Hour Party People, these beats sound tinny.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 16, 2019
2/5 30% The Corrupted (2020) The storytelling connecting its disparate elements starts to feel dashed-off, as if somebody involved couldn't wait for it to occupy the 10pm slot on London Live that may be its destiny.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 10, 2019
3/5 No Score Yet Dead Good (2018) Rose leads us gently, and with obvious empathy, into surprising and enlightening areas.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 9, 2019
2/5 50% A Dog's Journey (2019) Only its restlessness feels novel, tailored as it is to wet-nosed viewers made distractible by hours of scrolling through floof-centric Instagram feeds.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 3, 2019
3/5 81% Long Shot (2019) Casting Theron as a statuesque alpha is no stretch, yet the fun here lies in watching this performer relax around Rogen in a way few recent projects have allowed her to do.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 3, 2019
4/5 95% Styx (2019) Fischer literalises the turbulence we're now navigating, and asks some stern questions of our moral compasses.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Apr 26, 2019
3/5 75% The Dig (2018) With admirable economy the Tohills and screenwriter Stuart Drennan establish a stand-off between men in small, dark holes who have sublimated all feeling into obsessive, possibly futile activity.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Apr 25, 2019
3/5 39% Kalank (2019) A superlative piece of technical craft, one that rolls off several of the year's most beauteous shots.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Apr 19, 2019
2/5 34% Wonder Park (2019) You and your children will have sat through many worse films that took far easier routes to the screen - which is not to say that Wonder Park is not immediately forgettable.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2019
3/5 83% Amazon Adventure (2017) The film sets about its task in the same spirit of wide-eyed wonder as its subject, using movie art to bolster its science, and thereby retooling the Imax screen to serve as a high-powered microscope.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2019
2/5 53% Five Feet Apart (2019) [Richardson] surely realises, as Fault's Shailene Woodley did before her, that this is the kind of marshmallow martyrdom that has to be briskly worked through before they let you at the grownup scripts.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Mar 22, 2019
2/5 No Score Yet 90 Minutes (2019) With Chelsea money and a few more drafts, Baker might have arrived at a match-day fresco that merited the Altman comparisons he surely set out for.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Mar 14, 2019
3/5 No Score Yet I Am Rohingya: A Genocide in Four Acts (2018) Though the rehearsal footage is as sketchy as rehearsal footage tends to be, Zine has the sense to fold his cast-sourced anecdotes into the strongest potted history the movies have so far provided of this situation.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Mar 14, 2019
3/5 65% Fisherman's Friends (2020) This gentle, sweet-natured comedy has warmth and a certain X factor of likability, helped by big-hearted performances from a cast including Daniel Mays and Tuppence Middleton.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2019