Alison Willmore Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Alison Willmore

Alison Willmore
Tomatometer-approved critic

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
92% Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets (2020) As a film, it's warm and beautiful without being sentimental about the temporary intimacy that alcohol can provide, creating bonds that can dissolve in the daylightlike haze but are no less legitimate in the moment for it.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jul 10, 2020
93% Palm Springs (2020) One of its immediate pleasures comes in how dexterously it skims past many of the obligatory beats in order to get to less-explored territory.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jul 7, 2020
40% Irresistible (2020) Irresistible isn't just shockingly ineffectual in its insights into national schisms - it is, in an added betrayal, unfunny, requiring its audience to slog their way through so much laborious farce without a laugh in sight.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2020
92% Babyteeth (2020) Murphy succeeds in making her non-maudlin take on a mostly maudlin format in large part because of Scanlen...‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2020
73% The King of Staten Island (2020) Apatow has a nuanced understanding of his collaborator, but doesn't know what to do with him any more than SNL really does.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jun 9, 2020
87% Shirley (2020) With the support of Moss, who's become a specialist in deconstructing the idea of feminine hysteria, and Young, who plays Rose like the flushed heroine of a grim fairy tale, Decker ends up in a place that's strange and satisfying.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2020
92% The Vast of Night (2020) [A] sense of immediacy is essential to the salty-sweet contrast of the film, which combines a throwback premise with an unstintingly modern sensibility.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted May 29, 2020
96% The Painter and the Thief (2020) [A] strange, delicately made film, which manages to defy expectations about both of its subjects and the power balance between them.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted May 22, 2020
49% Scoob! (2020) It's really no better or worse than other selections from the genre it's part of - that slice of fast-paced, brightly colored kids movie that makes no pretense of being anything other than an adequate distraction for young attention spans.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted May 15, 2020
41% Capone (2020) The only thing that makes the monotony tolerable is Hardy's go-for-broke performance, which isn't effective, but is mesmerizing.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted May 12, 2020
93% Becoming (2020) It doesn't feel like it's laying the groundwork for a future campaign from its subject, not matter how adored it makes her look. Instead, it's more of an insistent feature-length case for the family having done, and given, enough.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted May 6, 2020
88% Selah and the Spades (2020) It's not a mobster movie as told with prep school kids - it's more like a movie intent on pointing out that mobsters are just teenagers who've grown up.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Apr 17, 2020
88% Swallow (2020) It takes place in a landscape that's largely internal - but that's territory that can be just as filled with darkness and dread as a forbidding mansion.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Mar 19, 2020
56% The Hunt (2020) It's regrettable that, despite all of its jabs at relevance, the movie has no desire to actually dig into the details of the anger felt by either side of the bloodsport event it imagines.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2020
83% The Way Back (2020) It's a performance that suggests the most interesting stretch of Affleck's career as an actor is still to come.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Mar 4, 2020
92% The Invisible Man (2020) Moss holds the film together with her deeply committed performance, and in particular with the defeated air that she gives Cecilia, one that's always there under her recovering cheerfulness or displays of brittle defiance.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
87% Emma. (2020) Emma. occupies a perplexing if ultimately pleasurable spot on the Austen industrial complex's twin axes of faithful/revisionist and realistic/stylized.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Feb 20, 2020
8% Fantasy Island (2020) Just wretchedly unenjoyable.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Feb 14, 2020
75% To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You (2020) It actually ends up unintentionally undercutting the relationship the film asks us to be invested in.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2020
78% Birds of Prey (And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) (2020) The movie never feels entirely decided as to what that is.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
91% Promising Young Woman (2020) Fennell's film is a vibrant, stylistically precise piece of work, but the sentiments it conveys don't feel examined. It's an acceleration off a cliff when what you'd really like to see is some kind of road forward, no matter how rough.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
99% Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020) Never Rarely Sometimes Always isn't agitprop for an era of increasingly restricted abortion access, though it'd be entirely justified and effective in being so.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2020
92% The Assistant (2020) What makes the film such a spare but searingly insightful treatment of the issues at the core of Me Too is the way it refuses to separate its unseen executive's sexual predation from the larger structures that enable it.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2020
75% The Gentlemen (2020) A movie that's clearly meant to be seen as a return to laddish form but that instead feels sour and begrudging - the work of someone who's got nothing left to contribute to the game but can't bring himself to leave it behind.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jan 23, 2020
91% Weathering with You (2020) Weathering With You comes across as YA in the best possible sense, in that the film's audience never has to stretch too far to get back to the feeling of being the age of its characters.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jan 16, 2020
21% Like a Boss (2020) How do you make a movie with Tiffany Haddish, Rose Byrne, Jennifer Coolidge, and Billy Porter, not to mention Salma Hayek in full human-cartoon form, and have it be so devoid of joy?‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jan 11, 2020
89% 1917 (2020) The artifice of the aesthetic premise overwhelms any of the film's other intentions.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 24, 2019
20% Cats (2019) There is something magical about the simple fact that this movie exists, in all its obscene, absurd wonder, its terrible filmmaking choices and bursts of jaw-dropping talent. ‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 18, 2019
69% Bombshell (2019) The tone starts off as knowingly satirical and ends on an unearned note of inspirational earnestness.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2019
27% A Million Little Pieces (2019) An underwhelming addiction story that feels not just familiar, but more focused on the bad-boy swagger of its main character than his actual recovery.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 6, 2019
89% The Two Popes (2019) The Two Popes may be a fantasy about a closed institution flinging its doors open, but it's also a compelling actor's showcase. The combination is surprisingly potent.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2019
95% Little Women (2019) It doesn't just brim with life, it brims with ideas about happiness, economic realities, and what it means to push against or to hew to the expectations laid out for one's gender.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Nov 25, 2019
77% Frozen II (2019) It's easier to think about Frozen II as a product than as a film because a (sometimes stunning-looking) product is all that it feels like.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2019
47% Last Christmas (2019) It is... a cozy viewing experience, which means that it's accomplished what it set out to do and will doubtless be put into seasonal rotation on cable networks as soon as possible.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2019
94% Honey Boy (2019) [A] project that sounds like it should be an act of celebrity indulgence but that instead turns out to be one of startling poignancy.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Nov 7, 2019
64% Paradise Hills (2019) A disappointingly half-baked riff on The Stepford Wives whose brand of feminism feels more 1970s than 2010s.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2019
58% Frankie (2019) Frankie, for all of its refusal to give into any kind of traditional narrative satisfaction, is rife with terrific little moments.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 24, 2019
90% The Lighthouse (2019) The Lighthouse is such an effective exercise in projecting claustrophobia, in both a physical and psychological sense, that it'd be unbearable to watch if it weren't so funny.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2019
26% Gemini Man (2019) Sometimes it's just difficult to know where to look - in one dramatic shoot-out in a store, I couldn't stop staring at the perfectly visible selection of chips lining the shelves they dove past.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
82% Judy (2019) She was an immensely complicated figure, but in Judy, she's a martyr.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Sep 27, 2019
83% Midsommar (2019) Midsommar mostly takes place in Sweden, but at its core is a particularly American sense of rootlessness.‐ BuzzFeed News
Read More | Posted Jul 26, 2019
55% The Dead Don't Die (2019) The Dead Don't Die is a notably sour movie, especially coming from someone like Jarmusch, whose previous work always seemed deeply affectionate about human weirdness, but who in this one basically waves humanity off as deserving its own extinction.‐ BuzzFeed News
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
93% Us (2019) Us revolves around an allegory that's more elastic and resistant to parsing than megahit Get Out.‐ BuzzFeed News
Read More | Posted Apr 18, 2019
58% Pet Sematary (2019) Pet Sematary [is a] fable fueled by a sense of culpability for things that aren't always explained.‐ BuzzFeed News
Read More | Posted Apr 18, 2019
82% Eddie The Eagle (2016) The overkill indicates an awareness that none of these would-be messages ring true.‐ BuzzFeed News
Read More | Posted Nov 6, 2018
86% First Man (2018) This is a movie that - flag or no flag - doesn't need to take a political stance to make a political statement. ●‐ BuzzFeed News
Read More | Posted Oct 18, 2018
90% A Star Is Born (2018) This movie has everything: a swept-off-your-feet romantic fantasy, an underdog-makes-good journey, a wrenching substance abuse drama, and an industry cautionary tale combined.‐ BuzzFeed News
Read More | Posted Oct 5, 2018
91% Crazy Rich Asians (2018) Feels blithely liberated from the obligation to offer up suffering that has long been part of the implicit bargain made with so many mainstream movies focused on characters of color-that they are treated as marketable in relation to the pain they portray‐ BuzzFeed News
Read More | Posted Aug 30, 2018
97% Mission: Impossible - Fallout (2018) Fallout is thrilling in a way that is out of sync with blockbuster fashions. It doesn't try for any sort of political resonance, and while it's a more direct sequel than past installments, there's still nothing you really need to know in advance.‐ BuzzFeed News
Read More | Posted Jul 26, 2018
47% Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018) Fallen Kingdom is the silliest and most purely enjoyable variation on a story that a few big studio productions have been offering recently.‐ BuzzFeed News
Read More | Posted Jun 27, 2018